Click Here to Register! 

Click Titles Below to Go Directly to Each Section 

Honorees

Session I Courses

Session II Courses

Dr. Bryant's Session

Sponsors

2022 Convention Brochure

Registration Information

 


 

 

Sponsorships and Advertising Information 

Sponsorship:

We have adapted our packages to accommodate the virtual event. It is a great opportunity to have your logo and information available to attendees throughout the convention process. Certain options offer your logo on all pre-convention advertising and on LACPA’s Website homepage and Convention pages.

Advertising:

The full-color Day Program is emailed to all attendees a couple days before the event.  The Program offers links to your website or video messages.  Deadline is October 17, 2022.

Click Here for Complete Sponsor/Advertising Information and Rates

 

 

Thema Bryant, Ph.D.

 

Diverse Healing Pathways for Sexual Trauma Survivors

 

Session III

 

Current president-elect of the American Psychological Association, Dr. Thema Bryant is nationally sought-after for her expertise in diversity, multiculturalism, and trauma research. She is a tenured professor of psychology at Pepperdine University and is the supervising director of the Culture and Trauma Research Laboratory at the university. She has authored and/or co-authored more than 50 publications including her book, Thriving in the Wake of Trauma: a Multicultural Guide, and has facilitated over 70 presentations and workshops nationally and internationally. Dr. Bryant’s clinical and research interests center on interpersonal trauma and the societal trauma of oppression. She provides national and international training on trauma recovery for marginalized communities, embodied psychotherapy, spiritual integration in psychotherapy, and liberation psychology.

 

Dr. Bryant has held many leadership positions within APA throughout her career. She is a past president of the Society for the Psychology of Women and a past APA representative to the United Nations. Dr. Bryant was a part of the first APA team to serve at the United Nations and within her tenure she contributed to the APA Resolution on Racism and Racial Discrimination. Dr. Bryant also chaired the APA Committee on International Relations in Psychology and served on the Committee on Women in Psychology.


 

 

 

Gretchen Kubacky, Psy.D.

Distinguished Service to LACPA

by a LACPA Member

- Served on The Los Angeles Psychologist Magazine
  editorial board since 2012
- Became The Los Angeles Psychologist Magazine
  Editor since 2019
- Served on the LACPA Board of Directors from 2011-2014,
  then again from 2019-present
- Served as LACPA Treasurer 2014

 

 

Senator Rosilicie Ochoa Bogh

 

Distinguished Legislative Award

  -Elected to the California State Senate in 2020

  and began her term on December 7, 2020.
 -Has done much to advance the cause of mental health
  and wellbeing in California, authoring and
  co-authoring several pertinent bills.
 -A strident advocate for increased and improved
  access to mental health services in California

 

 


 Carol Torcello

Lifetime Achievement Award

-31 years of dedicated service to LACPA 
-Director of Operations since 2017
-Worked closely with LACPA Convention, Continuing Education,
and Membership committees, as well as tirelessly organizing the office,
supporting the Board, Special Interest Groups, Clubs and
looking out for LACPA's best interests.

 

Click Here to Return to Top of Page


 

Welcome

8:00 a.m.

 LACPAs 2022 Convention Co-Chairs Jaz Robbins, M.A., and Bennie Harris, B.A.,
will give a short welcome to our attendees.

 

Session I

2.0 CE Credits all courses unless noted otherwise.

8:30 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.

Sessions will not be recorded

 

 

 Emerging Cumulative Trauma Within Family Systems                    
 Course Level: Intermediate

The presentation distinguishes between single episodic traumatic events resulting in PTSD diagnosis per DSM V, and the development of Cumulative Trauma states experienced by family members in family systems where substance abuse or mental illness exists. When misdiagnosed these untreated states remain potentially harmful legacies within families and society.

Katrina Wood, Ph.D., clinical psychologist, is the founder of Wilshire Valley Therapy Centers, serving the L.A. community since 1993. Born and educated in UK/US, specializing in trauma, she is the author of That’s Not What I Said, available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Her blog is titled www.healingpsych.com. She lectures frequently and has many articles published in the field of psychology. Dr. Wood writes music in her spare time.

Course Goals

  • Attendees will be able to expand existing limited definitions of the development of PTSD Trauma and discuss differences between Single Episodic Trauma and the emergence of Cumulative Trauma states.
  • Attendees will be able to assess distinctions between the diagnosis of PTSD experienced by Single Episodic Events, and the emergence of Cumulative Trauma states which emerge over extended periods of time.
  • Attendees will be able to identify and clarify the impact of various forms of neglect within family systems with specific markers which may also lead to suicidal ideation, including how to recognize and offset risk factors with contemporary approaches to treatment.
  • Attendees will be able to assess more efficiently the presence of cumulative trauma states as opposed to more traditional diagnoses such as ADHD in children, panic disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorders, and anxiety disorders. Subtle signs, cues, and signals in the therapeutic setting including body language and passing comments will all be examined and addressed, and processed through a clinical lens.

Program Outline

  • Discuss origins and development of contextual cumulative trauma states within family systems from object relations and Self Psychology and contemporary theoretical models.
  • Discuss the impact of Mental Illness addiction and behaviors within family systems. 
  • Explore and describe the affect of ‘Shame’, from Sylvan Tompkins.
  • Discuss distinctions and impact of ‘custodian care’ and significance of ‘absence of emotional care’.
  • Explore the notion of the Cartesian Isolated Mind per Descartes vs. Heidegger’s Man is Steeped in Mood.
  • Explore misappropriation of the term Anger Management and Revisiting Anger.
  • Recognizing and discuss the impact of historical ‘trauma triggers’ in everyday life and developing healthy coping relational skills in ‘real time’.
  • Discuss the importance of expressing longings and losses in relation to untreated trauma states.
  • Discuss how development of untreated accumulative trauma states may lead to suicidal ideation and completion of suicide.
  • Challenge the concept of Sigmund Freud’s “Death Wish”. Explore the concept of the presence of a “Relational Home” per Dr. R.D. Stolorow.
  • The transference within the therapeutic setting stimulates trauma states and in the workplace. Present coping and management techniques for patient awareness and healing.
  • Explore the idea of an unattended historical emotional Fuse/Ticking Time Bomb.
  • General overview. 

 

 Helping Intercultural Couples Attune, Change, and Liberate           
 Course Level: Advanced

Intercultural couples experience more stressors and are at higher risk for discord and divorce. As a step toward collective healing, therapists can help partners effectively navigate the sociocultural differences in their intimate relationships. Learn how to foster sociocultural attunement, change, acceptance of differences, and liberation from self- and partner-blame.

Kathleen Eldridge, Ph.D., is a Full Professor at Pepperdine University in the Graduate School of Education and Psychology and a clinical psychologist. She teaches graduate courses in couple and family therapy, cognitive-behavior therapy, and mindfulness/acceptance processes. Recent publications include journal articles on working with intercultural couples and on client perceptions of the most and least helpful aspects of couple therapy.

Course Goals

  • List and describe the components of a DEEP framework for understanding cultural differences
  • List and describe the treatment methods used to foster change and acceptance around cultural differences
  • Utilize the DEEP framework to conceptualize cultural differences in a case example and to develop a treatment plan

Program Outline

  • Opening introduction
  • Self-introduction and audience interaction/engagement 
  • Introduce intercultural couples  
  • DEEP framework
  • Treatment methods 

 

How to Heal: Neuroscience and Our Nervous Systems                                 
Course Level: Intermediate

In this interactive workshop, participants will learn about the science and practice of the mind-body health connection. Participants will engage in hands-on activities to apply techniques for vagal nerve stimulation and stress management, including diaphragmatic breathing, EFT-based energy tapping, EMDR-bilateral tapping, chair yoga, values journaling, and havening touch.

Monica Blied, Ph.D., MACL,  is a clinical psychologist in private practice, adjunct professor at Pepperdine, wife, mother of three, and 10-year lupus warrior. Specializing in providing integrative care centered upon the mind-body health connection, Dr. Blied recently launched the “Faces of Health” mobile app, which teaches neuroscience-based skills to reduce stress. Learn more at www.drblied.com/app.

Course Goals

  • Identify the role of the vagus nerve and parasympathetic nervous system, and describe how they relate to various states of the body (e.g., activated versus relaxed)
  • Demonstrate from practice two or more activities designed to activate the body's relaxation system and vagus nerve, decrease tension and stress, and promote healing
  • Describe the 3-Rs for relaxing your mind (thought management techniques)

Outline

  • Introduction and agenda
  • Review of the health effects of stress, including a 3.5-minute video 
  • Mind: cognitive behavioral therapy strategies for thought management intro 
  • The 3-R’s for managing anxiety 
  • Art therapy exercise 
  • The triangle method for regulating distress 
  • Body: breathwork exercises including box and rectangular breaths
  • Havening touch and EFT tapping 
  • Gentle chair yoga/ range of motion exercises 
  • Spirit: tapping into purpose and meaning in life 
  • Connecting with your values for healing 
  • Values journaling exercise
  • Resources for your clients and yourselves 
  • Q&A 

 

Anti-racist Group Therapy Principles and Strategies                                                        
Course Level: Intermediate

Despite hopes to create safe spaces, for many patients and practitioners of color, group therapy is another setting for marginalization. To avoid causing deep harm, racist behaviors must be addressed effectively. This workshop will teach practitioners how to identify, understand, and intervene following microaggressions in group and individual therapy.

 

Faria Kamal, Ph.D.,  is a psychologist and Assistant Professor of Medical Psychology at Columbia University Medical Center. She provides evidence-based therapy to children, adolescents, adults, and families. Her research on underserved communities has been published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at numerous academic conferences. In addition, she provides consultation to teams internationally on DEI and anti-racist practices in therapy.

 

 
Marcus Rodriguez, Ph.D., is the Founder and Director of the Youth and Family Institute and Assistant Professor of Psychology at Pitzer College. He specializes in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) and consults for Behavioral Tech (BTECH). Having grown up in Mexico and lived in China for nine years, he provides training to mental health professionals internationally in Spanish and Mandarin.

 

 

Course Goals

  • Explain key differences between non-racist and anti-racist therapists.
  • Identify three categories of microaggressions in therapy.
  • Demonstrate effective interventions and repairs following racist interactions in therapy.

Outline

  • Introduction
  • Anti-racist Therapist Agreement + Anti-racist Patient Agreement
  • Therapist Decision Making
  • Common Therapist + Group Dilemmas
  • Types of Microaggressions in Therapy
  • Interventions + Repairs
  • Discussion + Q&A

 

STUDENT CIRCLE: “Transitioning from Student to Professional”                                                                                      
No CE Credits Available

This workshop will give current master’s and doctoral students insight into the mindset shift required to close the chapter on student life as they walk into their new professional identities. The event’s moderator and panel are in the process of successfully navigating this shift.

Jaz Robbins, M.A., will earn her Doctor of Psychology from Pepperdine University in August 2022. She is a nutritionist, an instructor of graduate courses at Pepperdine and UCLA Extension, a published author, and a nonprofit founder. As a postdoctoral fellow, Ms. Robbins will work in the field of health psychology where she will integrate her expertise in nutrition with traditional mental health interventions.

 
Bennie
 Harris, B.A., is a Doctoral Candidate and field placement intern working under supervision at the Kieffer E. Frantz Clinic, of the C.G. Jung Institute in Los Angeles.

                                       

 

 

 Click Here to Return to Top of Page


 

Session II

2.0 CE Credits for all courses

11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. PT

Sessions will not be recorded

 

 Sociocultural Considerations in Mindfulness and Compassion Interventions                 
 Course Level: Intermediate

Mindfulness and compassion have emerged as areas of focus in psychotherapy. Effective application with Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) requires attention to sociocultural factors such as cultural identity and values, racial/cultural trauma, and the dynamics of intersectional oppression. Cultural and sociopolitical dimensions of mindfulness and compassion will be explored with implications for psychotherapy and community interventions.

Shelly P. Harrell, Ph.D.,  is a Professor at Pepperdine University. She has published and presented extensively on sociocultural and sociopolitical aspects of stress and well-being, cultural competence, and Black mental health. Her current work focuses on culturally-responsive contemplative practices and “soulfulness” interventions to facilitate resilience and liberation. She is a psychotherapist, meditation teacher, and consultant with 30+ years of experience with individuals, groups, and organizations.

Course Goals

  • Explain the rationale for considering sociocultural issues in mindfulness and compassion interventions with BIPOC clients.
  • Identify at least two important considerations when utilizing mindfulness with BIPOC clients.
  • Identify at least two important considerations when utilizing compassion and self-compassion interventions with BIPOC clients.

Outline

  • Introduction
  • Overview of mindfulness and compassion interventions; Conceptualization of sociocultural issues; Rationale for considering sociocultural issues in mindfulness and compassion interventions
  • Research on mindfulness-based interventions with BIPOC populations
  • Sociocultural considerations in mindfulness-based interventions with BIPOC populations
  • Sociocultural considerations in compassion and self-compassion interventions with BIPOC populations
  • Intervention example: “A Soulful Introduction to Mindfulness” group curriculum description and demonstration
  • Q&A with attendees

 

 Effective Treatment with the Suicide Bereaved                                                                                                               
Course Level: Advanced

In this training, Dr. Gutin will describe the unique aspects of grief following a suicide loss, and how this experience may vary within different cultures and demographic groups (including mental health professionals). She will provide guidelines for effective treatment for those loss survivors who seek clinical support.

Nina J. Gutin, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist in Pasadena, California, conducts trainings in Suicide Prevention/Postvention, facilitates “Survivors After Suicide” groups for the Didi Hirsch Suicide Prevention Center, and is a member of the L.A. Suicide Prevention Network. She is co- chair of the Coalition of Clinician-Survivors, which supports clinicians after personal/professional suicide losses, and has published several articles about Suicide Postvention.

Course Goals

  • Describe at least three of the unique issues and challenges encountered by survivors of suicide loss.
  • Describe how a survivor’s suicide bereavement trajectory may vary in relation to cultural and/or demographic factors and spiritual beliefs.
  • Describe at least three optimal goals for suicide loss survivors in psychotherapeutic treatment, and the interventions which are most likely to facilitate these goals.

Outline

  • Suicide Loss Survivors 
  • Variations in Suicide Bereavement 
  • Treatment of Suicide Loss Survivors
  • Q & A, Discussion 

 

Social Responsibility in the Neuropsychological Evaluation of Diverse Children                                                      
Course Level: Advanced

Culturally and linguistically diverse children experience similar rates of neurodevelopmental disorders than their peers and are routinely underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. This presentation will address strategies to improve the validity of neuropsychological evaluation with culturally and linguistically diverse children, particularly bilingual children, as well as ways to expand the role of the neuropsychologist and advocate for marginalized youth.

 

Vindia Fernandez, Ph.D., is a pediatric neuropsychologist with specialty training in neurodevelopmental issues including autism, epilepsy, ADHD, and learning. In 2017, Dr. Fernandez founded the Center for Pediatric Neuropsychology to address the growing need for culturally and linguistically appropriate evaluations for Latino/a children. She is also the director of Pediatric Neuropsychology at the UCLA Hispanic Neuropsychiatric Center of Excellence.

 

 
Alberto A. Miranda, Psy.D., is the director of training at the UCLA Hispanic Neuropsychiatric Center of Excellence. His clinical interests are in the application of cultural neuropsychology, where he provides specialized training in the assessment of monolingual and bilingual Hispanic patients across the lifespan. He conducts neuropsychological/psychodiagnostic evaluations for presurgical candidacy, differential diagnosis of dementia, and diagnostic clarification of neuropsychiatric/ neurodevelopmental disorders.

 

Course Goals

  • Describe the systemic barriers affecting the assessment and diagnosis of linguistically and culturally neurodivergent children
  • Identify strategies for assessing language proficiency and selecting appropriate instrumentation for bilingual children
  • Develop intervention plans that incorporate advocacy for marginalized youth

Outline

  • Advocating for Marginalized Youth (Vindia Fernandez)
  • Introduction
  • Race, Culture, and Neurodivergence
  • Students with Disabilities and Special Education
  • Cultural and Linguistic Factors Affecting Assessment
  • Factors that Affect Implementation of Recommendations
  • Discussion and Questions
  • Bilingual Assessment (Alberto A. Miranda)
  • Introduction
  • English Language Development
  • Bilingualism
  • Factors to Consider in Bilingual Assessment
  • Models of Assessment
  • Case Samples
  • Discussion and Questions

Strengthening Latinx Identity in Culturally Competent Therapy                                  
Course Level: Advanced

Latinxs are undergoing a racial crisis, given the current racially charged sociopolitical climate; making it imperative to increase cross-cultural skills to serve the largest, fastest-growing ethnic group, specifically in Los Angeles. This course was designed to increase participants’ knowledge and skills in strength-based culturally competent care for Latinx.

 

Anita Mihecoby, Ph.D., is licensed by the California Board of Psychology. She established the Conscious Culture Psychology Clinic in Los Angeles serving diverse populations. Her specialties include stress disorders and working with marginalized and underserved populations. Her research interests include multicultural psychology, Indigenous Ways of Knowing, cultural and behavioral health integrative programs, and mentorship. She enjoys supervision and program development.



 

Claudia Ocholski, M.A., is a graduate student at Nova Southeastern University, studying clinical psychology. She is a research intern under Dr. Anita Mihecoby, examining Mexican American identity. Her specialties include first-generation immigrants, crisis intervention, and working with underserved populations. Her research interests include multicultural psychology and removing the stigma attached to mental health issues. She enjoys conducting research.

 

Course Goals

  • Increase knowledge about the Latinx population, identity development, and cultural considerations for therapy
  • Develop skills to address therapists' implicit bias using cultural values theory as a strategy to create a stronger therapeutic alliance with Latino clients and increase the potential for client change.
  • Apply a strength-based treatment as a method of culturally competent care that can increase access to sensitive and supportive treatment for the Latinx community.

Outline

  • Introductions
  • Objective 1: Increase knowledge about the Latinx population, identity development, and cultural considerations for therapy.
  • Objective 2: Develop skills to address therapists' implicit bias using cultural values theory as a strategy to create a stronger therapeutic alliance with Latino clients and increase the potential for client change.
  • Objective 3: Apply a strength-based treatment as a method of culturally competent care that can increase access to sensitive and supportive treatment for the Latinx community.
  • Conclusions

 

Click Here to Return to Top of Page

 


 

 

Session III

2.0 CE Credits

2:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

This session will not be recorded

 

 

Diverse Healing Pathways for Sexual Trauma Survivors                             
Course Level: Intermediate


Sexual trauma may affect survivors’ emotionally, cognitively, socially, physically, financially, and spiritually. Interventions will be explored which have been found to decrease distress and enhance well-being among survivors. This presentation will attend to culture and spirituality, while also providing an overview of both commonly used interventions and innovative- known interventions.

Thema Bryant, Ph.D., current president-elect of the American Psychological Association, is nationally sought-after for her expertise in diversity, multiculturalism, and trauma research. She is a tenured professor of psychology at Pepperdine University and is the supervising director of the Culture and Trauma Research Laboratory at the university. She has authored and/or co-authored more than 50 publications including her latest book, Homecoming, and has facilitated over 70 presentations and workshops nationally and internationally. Dr. Bryant’s clinical and research interests center on interpersonal trauma and the societal trauma of oppression. She provides national and international training on trauma recovery for marginalized communities, embodied psychotherapy, spiritual integration in psychotherapy, and liberation psychology.

Course Goals

  • List psychological effects of sexual trauma
  • Explain the benefits and application of embodied healing
  • Discuss the integration of culture and spirituality in sexual trauma recovery

Outline

  • Introduction 
  • Overview and significance of presentation 
  • Definition and types of sexual trauma 
  • Effects of sexual trauma 
  • Overview of common recovery interventions 
  • Embodied Healing 
  • Integration of culture and expressive arts 
  • Integration of spirituality 
  • Empowerment and Resistance 
  • Questions and Answers 
  • Evaluations

 

Click Here to Return to Top of Page 


 

 

Virtual Happy Hour

4:45 – 5:45 p.m. PT

Dr. Thema Bryant will take part in our Happy Hour.

Please join us!

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Click Here to Return to Top of Page 


 

Click here to view the 2022 Convention Brochure

 

 

Click Here to Return to Top of Page  

 


 

 

Los Angeles County Psychological Association

34th Annual Convention - Virtual - Fee Information

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2022 - Via Zoom

 Featured Afternoon Speaker: Thema Bryant, Ph.D.

Diverse Healing Pathways for Sexual Trauma Survivors

 Convention sessions will NOT be recorded.

 


Click Here to Register

Live session selections will need to be made at the time of registration.

 

Changes can be made up to 10/22
if space is available.

LACPA Member
Registration

Max 6.0 Live CEs plus two recorded Convention programs up to 10 CEs 

PURCHASE BY

     10/14     /    10/22

Non-Member
Registration

 

Max 6.0 Live CEs



PURCHASE BY

     10/14   /    10/22

Per Session
Registration

Only want one or two programs,
not the whole package. 


PURCHASE BY

10/14   /   10/22

LACPA Member

$150   /   $165

 

$60   /   $65

Early Career LACPA Member

$125   /   $140

 

$50   /   $55

LACPA Post-Doc/Pre-Licensed or Student Member     No CEs

 $20   /    $20

 

$20   /   $20

Non-Member

 

$190   /   $215

$70   /   $75

Student Non-Member (Pre-Doctoral) must submit proof of student status - NO CE Credits

 

$35   /   $35

$35   /   $35

  

Early registration ends 10/14/22.

Registration ends 10/22/22.

                                                                                                                                                                                             

CANCELLATION POLICY: TO RECEIVE A REFUND, A REQUEST MUST BE RECEIVED IN WRITING NO LATER THAN OCTOBER 22, 2022. 

A $35 PROCESSING FEE IS DEDUCTED FROM ALL REFUNDS.

The Los Angeles County Psychological Association (LACPA) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. LACPA maintains responsibility
for this program and its content.
 

These sessions may be taken to satisfy the California Board of Behavioral Sciences (BBS)
continuing education requirements.
 

It is important to note that APA continuing education rules require that LACPA only give credit to those who attend the entire session.  An evaluation of the session must be completed. Those who arrive more than 15 minutes after the scheduled start time or leave before the session is complete will not receive CE credit. Partial credit may not be given.